How to Make Best Use of Social Media

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How can you make the best use of social media?

People spend an average of 2+ hours a day on social media. Find out how to maximize benefits and reduce the risks.

The benefits

  • A vital means of connection
  • Can maintain a sense of community through frequent moves and separations
  • Immediate access to important news
  • Not as anxiety-provoking as connecting in person, especially for those with social anxiety

The risks

  • Can increase depression and anxiety for some
  • Enables cyber bullying
  • Can be a distraction that impacts attention and productivity
  • Can pose a threat to OPSEC

Set clear boundaries.

Find tools to help you remain present with important tasks, friends, and family.

Beware comparisons.

Comparing yourself to other can lead to feelings of unhappiness and envy. Compare to feel inspired, not inadequate.

Curate your feed.

Prioritize what positively contributes to your life, and filter out what takes away from it.

Aim for quality.

The quality of interactions matters more than quantity. Give support to get support, and actively engage instead of passively observing.

Words matter.

You might be able to get a sense of others’ mental states through their language use. Pay attention and reach out if you think someone is struggling.

Disconnect often.

Turn off all devices 2 hours before bed to minimize the impact of blue light on sleep.

Monitor your child.

Discuss warning signs of predatory behavior or bullying that your children should alert you about.

Know the rules.

Families also need to know how to protect their Service Members by not sharing information that can impact operation security and mission success.

Always be respectful.

Your online behavior can negatively impact your military career and put you at risk for disciplinary action. Conduct yourself with the honor and respect deserved by the uniform.

HPRC

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Logo: USU (Uniformed Services University) and CHAMP (Consortium for Health and Military Perfomance)