How can I use imagery to improve performance

Mental imagery is the practice of seeing “in your mind’s eye” how you want to perform a skill, as if you were actually doing it. You can use it for just about any task, such as improving your Army Combat Fitness Test ACFT score (even if you’re sidelined with an injury), marksmanship, or giving a brief. Also, watching others can boost learning even more than mental imagery by itself because you’re observing what you’d actually like to do rather than coming up with images in your mind.

Use this worksheet to create a personalized imagery script for a specific event or task. To learn more about how you can use mental imagery to improve your performance, read HPRC’s articles about how imagery can improve your fitness and how to imagine your way to better performance.


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